Category Archives: Educating Educators

Inquiry Lesson Notes and Videos: K-6

Ask project

In the ASK (Adapting Science for Kids) Project, sponsored by the National Science Foundation, K-6 elementary teachers from rural Missouri and Iowa are creating science inquiry lessons that not only teach science concepts, but also facilitate instruction in other curriculum areas, such as reading, writing, and social studies. Lessons address topics in Life Science, Earth and Space Science, Science Processes, and Physical Sciences. Notes and videos describing how their lessons are adapted are available at www.justaskateacher.com (free registration is required). Teachers can comment on the posted materials, as well as submit their own adapted science lessons to the project.

10 shifts for educators to make in the upcoming school year

In a recent blog, Dr. Justin Tarte, gives the following ten shifts that educators need to make in the next year in order to be successful. You can catch the original blog post here: http://www.justintarte.com/?m=1 Remember…go follow and support other educators!

1). Stop saying ‘teaching’ and start saying ‘learning.’ This simple diction choice makes a ton of difference when it comes to how we think about student success.

2). Stop viewing technology as ‘one more thing’ you have to do in your classroom. Utilize technology to enhance, broaden, and create opportunities for learning that were never before possible.

3). Stop settling for what has been at the cost of what could be. The world has never before had more opportunity and more possibility to make education both relevant and practical.

4). Stop thinking it’s your school or district’s responsibility to provide professional development learning opportunities. We all expect our kids to be self-autonomous learners who take some ownership of their learning; educators should be no different considering all the avenues and paths that exist.

5). Stop limiting the audience with whom your students can interact and communicate. We live in a globally connected world so there is no excuse for students to be doing work that is just for one teacher’s eyes.

6). Stop trying to teach ‘responsibility and accountability’ by not accepting late work and not allowing redos on assignments and assessments.

7). Stop viewing education as something that is done to students and rather instead, as something that is done with and alongside students.

8). Stop doing what has always been done just because it’s always been done. If it can’t be justified with good cause, then yesterday was a perfect time to stop and start something new.

9). Stop fearing the unknown and use it as an opportunity to learn alongside your students. This not only sends a powerful message to your students, it also allows you to learn and grow as a teacher/student learning team.

10). Stop waiting for someone else to make a difference or make the change. You are the difference… you are the change.

-Dr. Justin Tarte (Twitter: @justintarte)

Section 1: Why Task Rotation?

Section 1: Why Task Rotation?

BUY THIS BOOK

via Section 1: Why Task Rotation?.

I recently attended a conference session where the presenter was talking about Task Rotation. Curious, I researched the strategy and came across this book on the ASCD website. I think this would be very beneficial for differentiating in the classroom. Similarly, I have scaffolded my lessons similar to this, but never this organized…and we know how much I like things to be organized!

Has anyone tried this strategy? Did it work? Pros? Cons? I would love feedback!

American schools need better teachers, so let’s make it harder to become one.

 

American schools need better teachers, so let’s make it harder to become one..

First of all…read the above article. Read it if you are a teacher…read it if you ever wanted to be a teacher…read it if you know you don’t EVER want to be a teacher.

Now…in my experience, I felt the rigor of the teacher program application process, when I applied to TeachGNO. I think that TeachGNO was aiming toward this. Why did it fail?

  • Teach for America teachers tool jobs so TeachGNO could not guarantee teacher-elects jobs.
  • They lost the grant

Why? In a post-Katrina world, when teachers weren’t returning home, and school systems were a mess.I thought they recruited the best of the best, well I WAS among those accepted. In my opinion, the problem was that they, the University of New Orleans, put someone in charge as a subsidy of the UNO College of Education. Had the program have been separate, maybe UNO execs wouldn’t have seen it as such a threat. Maybe they would have actually seen it as a way to recruit the best of the best, graduating from UNO, EVERY year.

I am biased. I saw some people fail…miserably. But that was all kinds of new teachers, TeachGNO, Teach for America, and traditional teacher preparation programs.

What they need to tell you is that it is hard. Very. Being a teacher is one of the hardest jobs I’ve ever done. And it doesn’t end when you get home from work. We are “on call” to administration, parents, and students. As much as you say you don’t, all of us have gotten fussed for not responding to one of the above in a timely manner.

If they want to recruit the best people, make it worthwhile.

There will also be this time period where sucky teachers are on the same playing field as great, well-prepared teachers. And that isn’t fair. But hey, life isn’t fair…and that is the FIRST class you should have to take when preparing to become a teacher.

EDUC 1000 Life Is Not Fair. Quit bitching. At the end of the day, know you are awesome. May the force be with you. Don’t teach the “don’t smile until October” or some other crap. Teach them to be prepared. Teach them that even the most prepared lessons fail, miserably.

But, when that kid, the one that hasn’t done anything all year, thanks you for being in his life, because his life “kind of sucks right now and you aren’t the worst thing in it”…that’s a good thing.

Smile and wave. The next big thing will be the same as the last big thing, but different. THIS time it will be required, and then it MAY go away. But hey, we are all required to do it, so we are all in this together. Take what you will and make it your own.

Advice? You won’t get your life back, in its entirety, for a good three years. Yes…I said it. Your life WILL suck and you will think about quitting all the time…but you won’t. Because when it is great it is amazing. And when it sucks, you will cry. And yes, in front of the children. But children have this amazing way of going home and coming back the next day to give you another chance. They forgot…we didn’t, but they did, and THAT is what matters. Dredge on.

I wouldn’t have it any other way.

Janet's Blog

Jams, Jellies and Jems

Maranda's World

Follow a single mother's journey raising two girls while pursuing her dreams and making a difference in the world.

Chronicles of the Tenacious Teacher

An exploration of the ins and outs of being an educator with a life!

From Under the Teacher's Desk

Topics Affecting Teachers Today

kathrynmercil

Learning to be more tech savvy!

mommytobe215

Baby #1 is on the way!

The Study Helper

A Study Skills resource for teachers and students

Foreman Favorites

Sharing a "Few of my favorite things"

Olivia Latiolas

Learning from Special Education: What my students have taught me

jmacdougallblog

A fine WordPress.com site

lionangelaplaisance

Busy Busy Busy...... How can someone still be sane

courtneythib

fideli certa merces

thetraveledteacher

exploring the world and teaching at the same time

robbinbrown

First time blogger

Christina Tims

Let's Get Healthy

Teacher's Lounge

"A child educated only at school is an uneducated child." -George Santayana

My Mind's Museum

Historical thoughts, present concerns, future directions

Thin spiral notebook

My journal of big words and pretty pictures

%d bloggers like this: